How to Clean a Shower Thoroughly

Rose Morrison

Apr 1, 2021

how to clean a shower

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Your shower gets soaped up and rinsed every time you hop in, so why do you still have to clean it? Well, if you don’t scrub and sanitize your shower, it can become a breeding ground for bacteria, mold, mildew, and soap scum. That doesn’t exactly make you want to strip down for a soak in the tub, does it?

If you’re ready to restore your shower to its original glory and rinse off in a clean space, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and get to work.

1. Scrub the Floor and Walls

The floor and walls of your shower are wet nearly 24/7, which can cause pink biofilm, black mold, and mildew to grow in and around the tiles and corners. If they hang around too long, they can discolor grout and stain porcelain and plastic tubs.

Keep the bacteria at bay by washing the walls and floor every few weeks. Use a scrubber with a diamond-shaped head to clean corners and between tiles. Rinse off the scum and wipe down the walls with a mixture of vinegar and dish soap or your favorite bathroom cleaner. We’re a fan of ECOS shower cleaner.

2. Wash the Curtain and Liner

Your shower curtain and liner are basically the fourth wall of your shower, so they deserve a good cleaning every now and then, too.

Spray your liner with bleach, vinegar, or your favorite cleaner each time you shower. Just remember to wrap up in a towel and get out of the tub first. Replace it annually or biannually to prevent major buildup.

You should also toss your fabric curtain in the wash every few weeks. Add a cup of bleach to the wash water if you’re battling a thick layer of mildew. Allow it to run through the spin cycle, then hang to dry.

3. Wipe Down Glass Doors

On the other hand, if your shower has a glass door, you’ll have to tackle grime and buildup differently.

Make your own cleaning solution with 1/4 cup of dish soap, 1 cup of water, and 1/2 cup of distilled vinegar. Spray your door and allow it to sit for at least 30 minutes. Then, wipe it down with a sponge or cloth and rinse.

Are you dealing with leftover streaks? Combine 2 tablespoons of ammonia with 2 quarts of warm water and respray your door. Wipe clean after three minutes.

4. Scrub the Handles and Drain

If your shower handles, drain, and faucet are made of shiny metal, you might not notice scum and grime. However, bacteria can still grow in and around these places, so it’s wise to give them a scrub every so often.

Use a brush or sponge and your go-to bathroom cleaner, and go to town on your hardware. You might even use a polish to shine up old metal handles and give them new life. Otherwise, a solution of vinegar and water will work just fine.

5. Cleanse the Showerhead

Have you ever replaced your showerhead? If you answered “no,” you might be rinsing off with scummy water without even realizing it. Luckily, you can ensure your enviable water pressure isn’t also blowing out bacteria by cleaning the showerhead on a monthly basis.

The easiest way to sanitize your showerhead is to fill a plastic bag with white vinegar and tie it around its neck with a rubber band. If you have a stainless steel showerhead, allow it to soak for a few hours or overnight. Remove the bag on brass, gold, and nickel-coated heads after 30 minutes to avoid damaging the finish.

Scrub and remove stubborn buildup with a toothbrush. Then, rinse and buff the head with a soft cloth.

The Best Way to Clean Your Shower

The best way to maintain a spa-like atmosphere in your shower is to be proactive. Spray and wipe down the walls before you notice soap scum. Clean the shower liner before mold starts to cling to the plastic. The more you can do after each shower, the easier it will be to keep everything sparkling clean.

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